Silverlight and COM

Silverlight supports interoperability with COM, and that is a good thing. It does not support registration-free COM, and that seems to me a missed opportunity. This lack of support for registration-free COM has, however, no impact on the importance of COM.

COM

Many books have been written about COM, and none of them can give a short definition of COM that is also comprehensible to people that not already know what COM is. So, here we go, and take the same route J: COM is a software development discipline to develop reusable components. This reusability is at the binary (not human readable) level. There is a standard way of interacting with COM components. Interaction with COM components is programming language and location independent. COM components may (depending on how they are built) support parallelism.

Relevance

The relevance of COM is enormous. Microsoft has written a great deal of its software (Windows) as COM components. For instance, DirectX consists of a number of COM components. Windows 8 is also being built upon COM. The Windows 8 WinRT layer is an intermediate layer of components that are built on COM (are COM components). Each WinRT component implements the IInspectable interface, which inherits from IUnknown. However, working with WinRT is unlike working with classical COM. See this article for more. The message is that COM, in some form or another will be with us for quite some time to come. Yes we are talking about the Windows platform here. The market share of Windows among computers (including phones and tablets) that access the internet is at time of writing about 84%. Some see this go down, I think it will go up with the introduction of Windows 8 and its emphasis on tablets and phones, and its uniform user experience over a large range of devices.

The good thing for us is that it is far easier to use COM Components than it is to write COM components. Using WinRT components is even easier. On the other hand, let’s not dramatize writing COM. COM programming concerns only a very thin layer in you code; the interface with the outside world.

Writing COM

COM hinges on a few principles that are not very hard to understand. A good book on COM is Don Box’s. Programming COM is quite a bit tougher. To my opinion this has to do with the large amount of macros (#define, #ifdef), typedef-s and odd naming conventions. I understand the typedef-s and macros’ are there to make things simpler. Point is that there are so many simplifications that they pose a problem; why can’t I just use the C++ I already know?

ATL

But then, if you really want to write COM, you will use ATL (Active Template Library). This makes writing COM much easier (‘easier’ as in “I don’t know what I’m doing”) writing ATL is a science in itself. I find it very hard to recognize the COM in ATL. An online introduction on ATL is here. The latest version number of ATL is unknown (to me). Visual Studio 2005 carried ATL 8.0. I’ve found no version numbers specific to VS2008 or VS2010.

Attributed ATL

There is a special flavor of ATL called “Attributed ATL” or ATL and Attributes. The attributes were added to make programming ATL simpler. And I think it does. However, the general public doesn’t seem to have adopted this style of programming due to diminished control over the ATL / COM code – the attribute would typically lead to source code insertion. See also the introduction into ATL referred to above. For an introductory article into Attributes ATL see here. In community forums the dominant emotion is that Attributed ATL is deprecated.

Registration-Free COM

Registration-free COM objects are a special case of Isolated Applications and Side-by-Side Assemblies, which is deployment and servicing technology for both native and .Net applications. Introductions into Registration-Free COM are here, and here. Isolated applications and Side-by-Side assemblies depend on the use of manifests. An assembly is an abstract entity defined by the manifest. Then, of course people choke on manifest creation. A handy tool is Regsvr42.

How does registration-free COM activation work? When a client application loads a dll holding a COM component, the loader checks if the application has a manifest before it checks the registry. If there is an application manifest, the loader searches for (a) library manifest(s). If found the COM component gets loaded and executed. This approach makes registration of COM components unnecessary. Requirements for registration-free COM to work are that the client is an application (something that has a process) and that this application has either an embedded or an external manifest associated with it. An embedded manifest cannot be overridden by an external manifest (except on Windows XP).

Silverlight

Silverlight supports COM interoperability. Wouldn’t it be nice then, if we could also ship COM components with the Silverlight Xap over the internet for execution elsewhere. COM components that we made ourselves, for instance. Of course, executing a COM component that is received over the web needs some user initiated installation in order to maintain the necessary protection against evils from internet. So, we do not expect to be able to execute our COM component within the context of our Silverlight application’s resources.

The current mission is to use the DirectX runtimes that are installed on every Windows 7+ systems from a Silverlight application. In this we can take the NESL approach: to install native software, like COM components, if the user installs the Silverlight application (installation of the Silverlight application is, for all practical purposes, required for use of the GPU). The installed application being the custom DirectX application to be used for ultimate 3D graphics and media effects in Silverlight. We could improve the user experience by skipping the installation of COM components, by using registration-free COM. Silverlight would then not require a search in the registry for a ProgId, the loader could read the manifest and simply load the required dll-s.

However, registration-free COM activation doesn’t work for OOB Silverlight Applications. These applications run in the process of the sllauncher.exe, which has an embedded manifest, as inspection with a simple text editor reveals. So, that ends the story of registration-free COM and Silverlight.

What can we do have?

We can have Silverlight applications, for instance Out-of-Browser applications, that consume COM components. If we bring our own component, we have to install it, registration-free activation will not work. Installation can be done the NESL way.

In some community forums thread someone wrote that only interoperability with out-of-process COM servers is possible. This is not correct. The consumed COM component should have a ProgId in the registry. It is not a requirement that is also is an application (has its own process). I’ve tested this statement with a simple in-process COM server that returns a string appended to its input string parameter: “Marc” -> “Hello Marc”. A 100.000 calls take about 760ms on my machine. By contrast, an out-of-Process server that does the same takes about 19 seconds. Both debug builds, by the way.

Since the Windows 8 Windows Runtime is built on COM, investment in COM expertise also seems to be future proof.

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Comments
  1. Chui Tey says:

    I was toying around with stripping off the embedded manifest from sllauncher, and then having a private copy of Silverlight bundled with the application. Licensing issues aside, I still couldn’t make SXS work. Any ideas?

    • Hi Chui Tey,

      Thanks for your comment!

      When I discovered the embedded manifest in sllauncher, I went on to PInvoke. You can load a COM component in a native PInvoke component, and then load the PInvoke component into a Silverlight application. You can find an article on the subject on my blog. Of course, you can distribute both the PInvoke component and the COM component with your Silverlight application. The performance penalty in general need not be more than 1 indirection per call to the COM component.

      Hopefully, this is of some help to you.

      Regards,

      Marc.

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